Dog Waste Bokashi

Environmentally Safe Treatment of Dog Poop

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All dogs do it, some more than others, but you're the human so you need to decide whether to just leave it laying on the ground for someone to step in, for other animals to eat, or to attract flies - or make an effort to treat it carefully and in an environmentally safe way.

Man and Dog going for a walk

I've heard of instances where someone followed along after their canine, picked up the waste in a plastic bag, knotted it, then flung the bag up on the roof of the park administration building - for many months. 

Imagine the horror of the poor maintenance worker, when confronted with hundreds of bags of dog poop, festering in the sun.

Don't be that dog owner.  Be ethical in your thoughtful treatment of your dogs poop.  Build a DIY bokashi, and keep the feces of at least one dog out of the landfill, or from polluting our ground water.

To build your bokashi, dig a hole in the soil - at least 16" to 20", and the width of the shovel is fine. 

Then cut the bottom off a bucket or nursery pot - we used this 7-gallon size.  The pot goes over the hole and hopefully will drop down into it a bit, leaving space at the lower end for the waste.  Find a lid of some kind to prevent the hole filling with water, which defeats the purpose of your bokashi.

Collect the dog waste with a shovel, or your bagged hand.  Drop it into the bokashi, and once it's been used for a few days, sprinkle in some sawdust, or dolomite lime. 

Then the secret ingredient - Septonic.  Although you can find special Bokashi fermentation mix, the Septonic is a lot cheaper, and does the same thing.

Once your bokashi gets full, to within a few inches of the bottom of the nursery pot or bucket, pull that out, replace the soil you dug out of the hole, and build another one a few feet away.  Several of these in various places around  your yard (near your dogs favorite defecating zone) keep your garden poop free.

Mark the spots where you've had previous bokashi spots - these are ideal for planting trees which thrive on the extra nutrients, but you don't want to dig right into the fermenting dog waste.

Help keep our environment clean, both for your beloved dog, and for all of us.








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