The Carsen Andrew Memorial Garden

Missing them...

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Losing a loved one is always hard; if it's an older person who has lived a full and happy life it doesn't seem so bad.  Sure, we're sad, but we have the comfort that they left a legacy of that life well lived.

Carsen Andrew Memorial Garden

If it's a young child, or a nursing infant, that's when we have real trouble accepting it; losing a child in any fashion leaves us bewildered, and the sheer unfairness of it makes our heart break in two.

The end of February 2014...

The garden will be a few months in the planning stages - there is over 40 cm (18") of snow to melt yet...

My way of dealing with the loss of my beautiful grandson, who I had yet to meet, is to build a beautiful garden. 

Although a garden was planned for the back yard of our tiny house, this just gives it added focus.  You can bet that extra care and thought, along with lots of love, will go into the design and planning stages, and also the building of it.

This is one time that trying to save money might not be the best way to approach it.  I would love to spend a ton of cash, if it would just take the awful feelings of grief and loss away.  That also is the wrong way to go about it.

A memorial garden should be a place of tranquility and joy, with little thoughtful and whimsical touches that bring some peace and a few moments of appreciation for a life well lived, no matter how short.

Pre-house construction, showing the site of the garden...

This picture shows the fundamental building blocks (the square pavers) that will be recycled into a patio area for the garden. 

With only enough to place them alternately, this will give me room in the spaces to plant some of my favorite succulents and other hardy plants. 

The house now sits where the black big foot forms are here.

Finally, they are emerging from under the snow...

It's early April, and the snow is finally revealing the mess - all the construction on the house came to a grinding halt as we rushed to make it habitable, and everything outside was abandoned where it lay. 

Now it's time to reassess, and start taking some measurements.

View facing east from the porch of the house...

Standing on the porch of the house, and looking east towards the Eggporeum...

...and looking the other way towards the house...

and standing beside the Eggporeum and looking west towards the house.  I particularly like how Bracken gets into both pictures...

The end of April shows a vast improvement...

Things are happening now - the snow is gone, and the ground is perfect for digging.  This is a project that is solely done by hand, with a potato rake, shovels and a wheelbarrow and a hand truck for moving the pavers.

The rickety porch is no longer; dismantled, recycled or burnt in the outside bonfire.

Taking the orientation of the Eggporeum for a guide...

The orientation of the Eggporeum creates a courtyard of pavers, which will be planted with low growing hardy succulents of all kinds, and thyme to make a green sward and soften the hard lines of the pavers.

The labyrinth...

Another commonly found motif in memorial gardens is the labyrinth.  Often used as a synonym for maze, this is different.  It can come in many different designs, most often in the Greek key type, but this one is slightly different and uses the native flat rocks found in leveling the area.


The plants that I will choose for this garden are outlined here

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